Wednesday, 19 May 2010

Direct experience of the mystery is what makes life bearable when it is otherwise being unbearable.

The interesting thing about "god" is that we don't know. We barely even know what the question is; let alone what the answer is.

A useful way of using the word "god" is as a signpost pointing towards our collective ignorance – the “unknown” – the majestic mystery that lies at the centre of being and also our being. Experiencing the mystery is not something that I would want anyone to miss out on.

When we deny the mystery, or convince ourselves that the question of the mystery has been answered, or doesn’t merit being asked, or is meaningless, or any of those other ways we have to avoid confronting the mystery, we deny ourselves the direct experience of the mystery. The direct experience of the mystery is what puts a smile on the face of the Buddha (and he didn’t believe in god either).

There is no reason why any of This should exist. And yet it does.

The direct experience of the mystery is what makes life bearable, when it is otherwise being unbearable.

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